Structured essay questions for history

A structured essay question seeks for a structured answer from from past successes and failures the only reason why people study history?.
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To what extent is managing racial differences the most important strategy in preventing the outbreak of social riots? I agree that managing racial difference can be an important strategy in preventing the outbreak of social riots. To what extent is social impact the most damaging effect arising from transnational terrorism? To what extent was the military impact onIraqa serious consequence of the Gulf War in ?

I agree that military impact on Iraq was a serious consequence of the Gulf War. Think like an Ess. Skip to content. Posted on October 27, by mamafess. Bonding Posted on October 26, by mamafess. Deterrence Terrorism Impact Posted on October 17, by mamafess. Search for:. It is important that students keep the materials for the essay journal reflections, evidence logs, writing handouts in a safe place, because they will refer back to them over the course of the unit in preparation to write the essay assessment. Ask students to reread their journal responses from Introducing the Writing Prompt and then respond to the following question:.

What does learning about the choices people made during the Weimar Republic teach us about the power and impact of our choices in the world today? Have students share their ideas with a partner or small group, or you might use the Two-Minute Interview strategy and encourage students to add new ideas to their journal responses that expand or challenge their thinking about the prompt. Annotate and Paraphrase Sources If you have not yet taught students how to annotate or paraphrase sources, you might want to devote a class period to modeling and practicing this skill.

We recommend that students start to gather evidence that supports or challenges their initial thinking about the writing prompt at this point in the unit.

Preparing to Write an Argumentative Essay

Evidence logs provide a place where students can centralize and organize evidence they collect over the course of a unit. There are two templates for evidence logs on our website and an additional index card format in the Common Core Writing Prompts and Strategies Holocaust and Human Behavior supplement. In your think-aloud, you might first select a piece of evidence that is irrelevant to the topic and then explain to the class why you are not going to use it.

Then select a relevant piece of evidence and enter it into the chart.

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Students should work individually, in pairs, or in small groups to gather evidence from their readings and class notes about the Weimar Republic that helps them answer the essay topic question. After students have gathered their evidence, have them share their findings and add more evidence to their logs using the Give One, Get One strategy.

Final Reflection In a final journal response or on exit cards , ask students to respond to the following questions:. Has any evidence that you recorded confirmed your initial thinking about the topic question? Has any evidence that you recorded conflicted with or challenged your initial thinking about the topic question? Which choices by individuals, groups, and nations in the history that you have learned about so far in this unit seemed most significant? What made those choices powerful or impactful? In addition to addressing the writing prompt in a journal reflection, students will start to evaluate the quality and relevance of the evidence they are gathering.

Before introducing the final historical topic for the essay, the Holocaust and its legacy, now is an appropriate time in the unit for students to review the documents and videos from Lessons 14 to 18 and consider which information supports, expands, or challenges their thinking about the writing prompt. Which choices made by individuals, groups, and nations in the history that you have learned about so far in this unit seemed most significant?

Students are now ready to reflect on, gather evidence for, and discuss the unit writing prompt in its entirety:. In addition to reflecting on the entire prompt and adding evidence from Lessons 19 to 21 to their evidence logs, you might also ask students to engage in structured conversations or mini-debates that challenge them to support their ideas about the writing topic with evidence and listen actively to their peers.

For many students, the process of talking before writing helps them organize their thoughts, explain their thinking, and develop a clear point of view. After finishing this unit, students will need time to complete their evidence logs, develop and refine their thesis statements, organize their evidence into an outline, and draft, revise, and edit their essays. The suggested activities that are presented below will help your students think about the unit as a whole as they answer the writing prompt, as well as start to prepare them to write a strong thesis statement for their essay.

For ideas and resources for teaching the remaining steps of the writing process from outlining to publishing, we encourage you to consult the Common Core Writing Prompts and Strategies supplement and the online Teaching Strategies collection for activities and graphic organizers to support your teaching.

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Students identify the social and cultural factors that help shape our identities by analyzing firsthand reflections and creating personal identity charts. Students create working definitions of stereotype as they examine the human behavior of applying categories to people and things. Students learn a new concept, universe of obligation, and use it to analyze the ways that their society designates who is deserving of respect and caring. Students draft a working thesis statement for an argumentative essay about the impact of choices in history. Students analyze the socially constructed meaning of race and examine how it has been used to justify exclusion, inequality, and violence throughout history.

Students explore the long history of discrimination against Jews and come to understand how anti-Judaism was transformed into antisemitism in the nineteenth century.


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Students begin the unit's historical case study by exploring the brutal realities of World War I and the impact of the armistice and the Treaty of Versailles. Students reflect on the idea of democracy as they analyze the politics, economics, and culture of Germany during the period of the Weimar Republic. Students start to gather evidence that supports or challenges their initial thinking about the writing prompt. Students examine how choices made by individuals and groups contributed to the rise of the Nazi Party in the s and s. Students examine the steps the Nazis took to replace democracy with dictatorship and draw conclusions about the values and institutions that make democracy possible.

Students consider the choices and reasoning of individual Germans who stayed quiet or spoke up during the first few years of Nazi rule. Students respond to the writing prompt in a journal reflection and begin to evaluate the quality of the evidence they are gathering. Students analyze several examples of Nazi propaganda and consider how the Nazis used media to influence the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individual Germans.

Students learn about the experiences of people in Nazi Germany through a variety of firsthand accounts and identify the range of choices that they faced. Students learn about the violent pogroms of Kristallnacht by watching a short documentary and then reflecting on eyewitness testimonies. Students think about the responsibilities of governments as they consider how countries around the world responded to the European Jews trying to escape Nazi Germany. Students share their ideas about the writing prompt in groups and continue to build their evidence logs.


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  • Students are introduced to the enormity of the crimes committed during the Holocaust and look closely at stories of a few individuals who were targeted by Nazi brutality. Students deepen their examination of human behavior during the Holocaust by analyzing and discussing the range of choices available to individuals, groups, and nations. Students grapple with the meaning of justice and the purpose of trials as they learn how the Allies responded to the atrocities of Nazi Germany.

    Students approach the unit writing prompt in its entirety through journal reflection, evidence, gathering, and discussion. Students both respond to and design Holocaust memorials as they consider the impact that memorials and monuments have on the way we think about history.


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    • Students complete activities that help them think about the unit as a whole as they prepare a strong thesis statement for their essay. Add or Edit Playlist. Step Essential Question What does learning about the choices people made during the Weimar Republic, the rise of the Nazi Party, and the Holocaust teach us about the power and impact of our choices today?

      Structuring your argument

      Guiding Question Why study history? Learning Objective Students will develop an initial position for an argumentative essay in response to a question about the importance and impact of choices in history. Overview In the first four lessons of the unit, students explore questions about identity, stereotyping, and group membership.

      Unit Writing Prompt: What does learning about the choices people made during the Weimar Republic, the rise of the Nazi Party, and the Holocaust teach us about the power and impact of our choices today? Because the students have not yet been introduced to the Weimar era, the rise of the Nazi Party, and the Holocaust, this lesson begins with a modified version of the prompt: Modified Writing Prompt for this Lesson: How does learning about the choices people made throughout history help us understand the power and impact of our choices in the world today?

      Generate Initial Responses to a Modified Essay Prompt Next, ask students to return to their seats and take out their journals so they can reflect on the Four Corners activity and start to think about a new and related question. Extension Dissect the Essay Writing Prompt If your class is ready, you might introduce the full unit writing prompt, rather than the one modified for this lesson. See More Information. Lesson 4: Universe of Obligation. Lesson 5: The Concept of Race.

      91 Outstanding History Essay Topics That Will Impress You

      Suggested Activities Journal Reflection Ask students to reread their journal responses from Introducing the Writing Prompt and then respond to the following question: What does learning about the choices people made during the Weimar Republic teach us about the power and impact of our choices in the world today? Gather Evidence in an Evidence Log We recommend that students start to gather evidence that supports or challenges their initial thinking about the writing prompt at this point in the unit. Final Reflection In a final journal response or on exit cards , ask students to respond to the following questions: Has any evidence that you recorded confirmed your initial thinking about the topic question?

      Lesson 8: The Weimar Republic. Lesson 9: The Rise of the Nazi Party. Suggested Activities Journal Reflection Ask students to reread their last essay journal response that they completed after Lesson 8: The Weimar Republic and then respond to the following question: What does learning about the choices people made during the Weimar Republic and the rise of the Nazi Party teach us about the power and impact of our choices today?

      To allow students to interact with a number of their peers after they have finished writing, have them first share their journal responses with a partner. Then ask each pair to join another pair so the class is now divided into groups of four.